A Chinese Painted Pottery Equestrian Figure Tang Dynasty (618-906 A.D.) A Chinese Painted Pottery Equestrian Figure Tang Dynasty (618-906 A.D.)

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Finely modelled and enlivened with polychrome application, the seated figure with an upright torso, with the hands raised in front...

Many in stock

Finely modelled and enlivened with polychrome application, the seated figure with an upright torso, with the hands raised in front and forming fists, enveloped in a full length tight fitting tunic with a cowl at the front, the feet wearing black boots, her hair arranged in a high topknot, covered with a cloth cap, seated on a saddle with a fringed blanket underneath, the slender horse with its pelt embellished with fine blue-black paint, with its twisted tail rendered in rippling tendrils and swinging out behind, its bold heavy-lidded eyes sharply defined, standing on a flat stone plinth, with traces of white slip and red, blue, orange, blue-black and gold pigment, unglazed.

Sculptures such as these, known as mingqi or "spirit utensils" were placed in tombs to provide for the needs of the deceased in the afterlife. Horses were a sign of wealth, as strict sumptuary laws limited their use to people of a certain rank.

 

 

Finely modelled and enlivened with polychrome application, the seated figure with an upright torso, with the hands raised in front and forming fists, enveloped in a full length tight fitting tunic with a cowl at the front, the feet wearing black boots, her hair arranged in a high topknot, covered with a cloth cap, seated on a saddle with a fringed blanket underneath, the slender horse with its pelt embellished with fine blue-black paint, with its twisted tail rendered in rippling tendrils and swinging out behind, its bold heavy-lidded eyes sharply defined, standing on a flat stone plinth, with traces of white slip and red, blue, orange, blue-black and gold pigment, unglazed.

Sculptures such as these, known as mingqi or "spirit utensils" were placed in tombs to provide for the needs of the deceased in the afterlife. Horses were a sign of wealth, as strict sumptuary laws limited their use to people of a certain rank.

 

 

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